What type of battery charger maintainer should I purchase

Discussion in 'Power - Site Power/Batteries/Generators/Solar' started by Hey im Jay, Mar 20, 2018.

  1. Hey im Jay

    Hey im Jay Member

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    I'm looking to get a quick charge battery charger for when I need to charge my batteries and maintain them I heard somewhere to get one that does some type of D I don't know what kind that removes something I think I wish I was more helpful please advice needed and appreciate it thank you and cheers have a great day
     
  2. xxxapache

    xxxapache Well-Known Member

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    Does your trailer not have a converter?
     
  3. BikeNFish

    BikeNFish Well-Known Member

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    There really isn't a quick way to charge a deep cell battery. It usually takes a couple hours to charge them properly. Charging time also depends on how depleted the battery is.

    A good battery charger will be able to shut down automatically when the battery is charged. I own two chargers. One will shut down when the battery is charged and the second has a built in timer that I can set.

    You could also purchase a battery maintainer that will maintain a full charge on you battery. I also have these. Keeping a battery fully charged usually extends the life of the battery.
     
  4. Hey im Jay

    Hey im Jay Member

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    I believe this is what you're asking about the converter all I know is plug in the outside house wire Powers up everything haven't hooked up a battery to it but I know that it works how does this function if I run Battery what does it power inside does it convert it to 120 volt please help me understand this and if this charges automatically when I have a generator or if I'm hooked up to a landline thank you again everyone
     

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  5. f5moab

    f5moab Retired from the Federal Government

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    Suggest you go to the Progressive Industries website and look up the model number (I cannot read it in the photo).

    Most converters; NOT ALL, will usually give you three modes for charging the battery. A bulk mode to charge it up quickly if it has dropped below a certain voltage level, a mode to keep it charged and to supply power to appliances being used, and a maintaining mode that might kick in after about 48 hours or so when the battery is fully charged and there are no other drains on the system. This mode will maintain the battery with a small voltage level to keep the battery charged up but not overcharge to cause any battery problems (such as boiling out the electrolyte).

    With a good working converter, in between camping trips all you have to do is run a power cord from the garage or house to the trailer and plug it in till the next trip. That's what I do during camping season. In the winter I bring the batteries into the garage and connect them to a Battery minder to maintain them during the winter.
     
  6. myride

    myride Well-Known Member

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    :rolleyes::rolleyes: x2 to f5moab's suggestion
     
  7. Hey im Jay

    Hey im Jay Member

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    Update found model number found the manual though it is very leak on what it says here are the photos from the mail it does not charge through the converter I hooked up my generator plugged it in flipped it to battery switch flipped to the center and flipped it also to where it says converter and there was no juice feeding back to the battery also on the plate where it says charger there is no number in the Box indicating charging on the front panel. I have also included the model number . So that being said should I bring a fast battery charger to charge the batteries that way the charge will also tell me how full they are I'm lost on this whole situation and need advice to guide me in the right direction thank you again for your patience and understanding I'm sure once I learn this stuff it'll be a breeze
     

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  8. littlebritches

    littlebritches Member

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    I know this was a year ago, but I am hoping for a follow up answer.

    What KIND of battery charger to do the "quick/2 hour" charge.

    I have a generator and am boondocking frequently. My battery was fully charged when I left. However, we ran the lights for several hours in the evening and ran the heater A LOT over night. It took my battery between 25 & 50%. I ran my generator for 2 hours and my charger didn't even charge it up to 1/2. When I got home the next day, my charger (plugged in at my house) took 4-6 hours to bring the batter back to full charge. What KIND of battery charger (specific would be best) to get the majority of the job done in 2-3 hours of generator charging.
     
  9. BikeNFish

    BikeNFish Well-Known Member

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    Charging time depends on the amperage of the charger. If you have a charger that is 10 amps or greater, your charging time will be greatly reduced. I cannot remember off hand what the amperage is on my charger (10 amps??) but it takes about three hours to charge my batteries.

    I also have a 6 amp switch on the charger but I never use it.
     
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  10. Anthony Hitchings

    Anthony Hitchings Active Member

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    Yup - pretty much is a function of charger amperage capacity
     
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  11. Eric Webber

    Eric Webber Active Member

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    To build on that, think of the rated output of the charger as an ideal conditions (unicorn level optimistic) value

    If you have a 100ah (12v) battery, you have (in a perfect world) 1200 watt hours - or 1200 watts for an hour (600 watts for two hours, etc)

    Assuming you never go below 50% (some batteries can go almost all the way down but they are expensive and rare lithium ones) you have at most 600 watt hours to charge back

    At (perfect conditions again) and using 110v on a 5A charger, you can charge 660w at a time. So to charge 600wh of capacity should take, in ideal circumstances with that setup, just under an hour. In the real world, you can hope for maybe 50% efficiency, so it’s more like two hours for that.

    A 10A charger is half the time due to being twice the wattage and so on.

    This also gives an idea how much solar you need. I have 200w solar setup with maybe 80w average production coming out of the cheap charge controller. So, for me to charge my battery, 10 hours of average light gets me 800watt hours of charge - but in full sun, I can get close to 200w where it would only take 4 hours
     
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  12. Eric Webber

    Eric Webber Active Member

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    When you say the battery was between 25% and 50% do you mean 25% remaining? Depending on the battery type that might be the issue. Lots of batteries don’t handle discharges that deep very well. Some never even charge back up properly. If it’s a Lead Acid or similar, try to keep it over 50%. I bet it will charge faster. You may need a higher capacity battery or even a second one - but if this one is toast, I wouldn’t wire it to a new battery. Too risky
     
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  13. SteveP

    SteveP Well-Known Member

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    The wattage output from a 5 amp charger would be closer to 14.4 volts at 5 amps, or 72 watts. Because resistance increases as the battery charges the amperage drops and it will probably take 4 hours or more to go from 50% to 80% SOC. About 2 hours, maybe a little more, with a 10 amp charger.

    The remaining 20% is where the charger really struggles, so most people are satisfied to try to maintain the battery at 80% while camping and fully charge the battery at home, which can take up to 10 to 12 hours.
     
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  14. Eric Webber

    Eric Webber Active Member

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    I stand very corrected. I assumed the output amperage was based on the 110v value rather than the 14.4v one. Assumed output was much higher amperage.
     
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  15. pagbaum

    pagbaum New Member

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    Newbie jumping in here. How does one find out the charge level of a battery? I have a brand new deep cell battery and an Elxir ELX converter that came installed in my new-to-me 2002 Sea Pine. I found the converter manual online already but I don't see anything on the converter itself or in the manual that would tell me how to know what state the battery is in. In other words if I plug the camper into an AC outlet in my garage, how do I know it's really charging and how do I know when enough is enough? Similary, how do I know how far I have drawn down the battery when I am on a trip?
     
  16. jmkay1

    jmkay1 2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah

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    @pagbaum. First of all welcome. The best tool to buy is a multimeter. This way you can test your battery to see your current charge. Below is a small chart to help you know about how depleted your battery. So a fully charged led acid battery at 100% should read 12.7. A deep cycle battery should not get down below 12.20 volts as it could shorten the life of your battery.


    State of Charge Sealed or Flooded Lead Acid battery voltage Gel battery voltage AGM battery voltage
    100% 12.70+ 12.85+ 12.80+
    75% 12.40 12.65 12.60
    50%. 12.20 12.35 12.30
    25% 12.00 12.00 12.00
    0% 11.80 11.80 11.80
     
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  17. pagbaum

    pagbaum New Member

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    Thanks jmkay1! super helpful.
     

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