What will you tell your grand kids.

dmaerz

Active Member
Feb 3, 2009
233
I remember when the government did not tell us what to do to stay safe, we just used common sense.

I remember when camping meant getting away form everything, not carrying everything with you and charging while driving.

I remember when cars had lighters, not 12V plugs. Cars had ashtrays too,

I remember mom calling us to come inside for dinner (hoping you heard before she added your middle name), not telling us to turn off the television or computer.

I remember when I could carry a pocket knife everywhere I went and teachers would borrow it from me.

I remember when getting out for the day meant walking or riding my bike. And the only helmet we wore was for football or hockey.

I remember listening to baseball on the radio, but only after the yard work was done.

I remember thinking having a sip of my dad's beer was a treat and getting in trouble meant the belt, and my dad did not worry about getting arrested for doing either.

I remember having fun as a child, learning to be responsible, and, now, thanking my parents for all they did (or didn't do).
 

screwballl

Stimulus Package
Aug 7, 2009
642
FL
dmaerz said:
I remember when the government did not tell us what to do to stay safe, we just used common sense.

I remember when camping meant getting away form everything, not carrying everything with you and charging while driving.

I remember when cars had lighters, not 12V plugs. Cars had ashtrays too,

I remember mom calling us to come inside for dinner (hoping you heard before she added your middle name), not telling us to turn off the television or computer.

I remember when I could carry a pocket knife everywhere I went and teachers would borrow it from me.

I remember when getting out for the day meant walking or riding my bike. And the only helmet we wore was for football or hockey.

I remember listening to baseball on the radio, but only after the yard work was done.

I remember thinking having a sip of my dad's beer was a treat and getting in trouble meant the belt, and my dad did not worry about getting arrested for doing either.

I remember having fun as a child, learning to be responsible, and, now, thanking my parents for all they did (or didn't do).

I guess with myself being raised in a small town in SD, that was all the same for me in the 80s (except the baseball on radio part).
 

Hyperterex

Super Active Member
Jan 1, 2010
1,023
dmaerz said:
I remember when the government did not tell us what to do to stay safe, we just used common sense.

I remember when camping meant getting away form everything, not carrying everything with you and charging while driving.

I remember when cars had lighters, not 12V plugs. Cars had ashtrays too,

I remember mom calling us to come inside for dinner (hoping you heard before she added your middle name), not telling us to turn off the television or computer.

I remember when I could carry a pocket knife everywhere I went and teachers would borrow it from me.

I remember when getting out for the day meant walking or riding my bike. And the only helmet we wore was for football or hockey.

I remember listening to baseball on the radio, but only after the yard work was done.

I remember thinking having a sip of my dad's beer was a treat and getting in trouble meant the belt, and my dad did not worry about getting arrested for doing either.

I remember having fun as a child, learning to be responsible, and, now, thanking my parents for all they did (or didn't do).

I think we may have had the same parents
 

RonB

Active Member
Jun 8, 2011
454
I stopped at a service station somewhere between Butte and West Yellowstone about 1-1/2 weeks ago. A local rancher or farmer had his truck and horse trailer on the opposite side of the diesel pump I was starting. He was a friendly sort and struck up a conversation. He shut down his pump and said: "Hell, there I go again. I just bought another tank of fuel that cost as much as my first car!"

I laughed and looked at my side of the pump, and quit laughing. "$70 -- That is twenty dollars more than I paid for my first car!"

After it settled in, we walked into the station together talking about the good old days when we would spend 10-11 hours a day pitching hay bales for .75 a ton.

RonB
 




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