Winter camping

Discussion in 'Cold Weather Camping' started by Jimbo1227, Jan 8, 2022.

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  1. Jimbo1227

    Jimbo1227 New Member

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    So this past summer was the first time me and my son started camping. He’s only 3 and we are hooked. I was wondering who camps in the winter and what equipment do you use or recommend? Preferably minimal equipment for us to be ok lol. Yhanks
     
  2. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member Platinum Supporting Member

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  3. Jimbo1227

    Jimbo1227 New Member

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    I mean I don’t wanna go in 6feet of snow but let’s say more like fall or end of fall and like right before spring hits when nights still get cold. We usually tent camp but even at the end of summer the nights we’re getting cold. I’m actually just buying a pop up now so would I be good with just a small heater.
     
  4. kcsa75

    kcsa75 Well-Known Member Gold Supporting Member

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    We took our Pup to Yellowstone National Park in August a few years ago. While daytime temps were in the 70s, it was 35 or below when I woke up every day we were there. DW whined a little but a couple blankets and a small electric floor heater and we were fine.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2022
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  5. Arruba

    Arruba Well-Known Member Gold Supporting Member

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    If you are seriously thinking of your target camping season including late fall and early spring, and you don’t have a unit yet, I’d suggest looking for a unit with a built in furnace to start. With that comes the question, are you more a dry or hookup type camper? Reason to question is furnaces take power and on board batteries can give only so much. With 110ac power available, a good portable heater works good.

    As mentioned, a search on here should yield several threads/topics on cold weather camping, it comes up from time to time. I will suggest when you look at them keep in mind your expected camping environment as a fair bit of the suggestions, including mine, are geared toward cold camping where the daytime high may not break the low forties.

    Good luck.
     
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  6. Jimbo1227

    Jimbo1227 New Member

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    Thanks for the help. Those aren’t my target season but I just wanna be able to go no matter what the weather. I just don’t wanna be limited to the summertime you know.
     
  7. jmkay1

    jmkay1 2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah

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    I camp many times in the late fall early spring in a traditional popup with a built in furnace. So long as days are above freezing I will camp, although I do watch the weather more at those times. I will also try and look into a site with electric. A traditional popup with canvas is very similar to a tent In that it doesn’t hold the heat in very well and can be drafty at times. So we often have to use other additional things such as reflectix, popup gizmos, in addition to the furnace and sleeping bags at night. If it’s particularly windy rigging a blanket over the door may be needed. If you do plan to camp in the cold I strongly suggest to look for a camper with a built in furnace. An electric heater can work but take my word for it, struggles keeping up when it’s too cold. So having the furnace to supplement that will make things far more comfortable. Just don’t expect a steady 65 or you won’t have any propane left. Dress in layers keep a few space blankets handy, a warm hat, clean wool socks you should be warm enough. With that said, I couldn’t camp with my side kick in the cold much when she was young as she absolutely refused to use a sleeping bag and she moved like a freight train at night so blankets were worthless. Even worse she is not a good sleeper so she never could get back to sleep if she woke up.
     
  8. Jimbo1227

    Jimbo1227 New Member

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    Sounds like my twins. Even at home the blanket never stays on. Thanks for the advice. I will absolutely get one with a furnace. Even in the summer I carry extra blankets. Maybe it’s because I’ve been driving a truck at night since I was 18 and getting stuck in a truck in winter is probably just as bad as a tent lol
     
  9. Dingit

    Dingit Well-Known Member

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    We always have winter sleeping bags and enough adequate clothing to not have to rely on the camper's mechanicals--or even the TV.

    But we usually camp in more remote areas where cell service is unreliable and you have to be a bit more self-reliant in case something goes wrong.
     
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  10. Jimbow

    Jimbow Well-Known Member

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    The challenge with a pup is the air circulating under the bunks is cold and you will get cold from below, as well as above. If you are on hookups, an electric blanket under your sheet will really help. I've also seen folks enclose their bunk ends to the ground. They can use the set up in summer to store things out of sight.

    Mummy style sleeping bags are generally warmer than blankets because there is less area for your body heat to warm up.
     

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